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Why a muzzle?

“Mine doesn’t need one of those!” so why a muzzle? For ages, the muzzle has been one of the most frowned-upon aids for dogs. The environment still perceives a muzzled dog as potentially dangerous, even aggressive. Every dog owner whose dog wears a muzzle from time to time knows the “wry looks” of others. The reason why the muzzle is worn is irrelevant here. But isn’t there a touch of irony behind the fact that a muzzle causes fear? Although it prevents the dog from biting and thus eliminates the potential danger?

But the truth is different: the muzzle offers many advantages not only for the dog, but also for his owner!

But let’s be honest, why a muzzle for your dog? You can and should train your dog properly! You hear this and similar questionable statements all the time!

Of course, this also includes protection for reactive dogs. In this case, the muzzle not only makes it easier to train the dog. The muzzle also helps the owner to handle situations in which the dog reacts in a more relaxed way. In this way, less agitation is brought into the situation. A muzzle is also worth its weight in gold when resocialising dogs.

Another reason to get the dog used to a muzzle responsibly at an early age with muzzle training is the visit to the vet. You never know if your dog might get sick and need a muzzle at the vet. Then you want to avoid as much as possible the additional stress of a muzzle that is not well accustomed.

Many of us know it: the dog is like a hoover on a walk and eats everything that somehow crosses his path? In this case, a muzzle makes life a lot easier for the dog owner. Perhaps you live in an area where dog haters occasionally get up to mischief. You are worried about possible poison baits. Then the muzzle is often the desired rescue. The dog can then run and sniff again without the risk of being poisoned.

Many of us want to take he dog on holidays. You should find out exactly what the regulations are before. The regulations on muzzling or keeping dogs can vary from province to province and, of course, also abroad. Even on public transport, at least in Austria, every dog must always be muzzled.

Verena Lanner

Certified Animal Psychologist